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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
to beat president obama. a look at the war in afghanistan. now the longest war. how do we get out? does obama's policy differ from president bush's and what is the effect for generations to come? joe and mika and willie join in the conversation later this hour. we begin with the debt crisis. they are trying to make a deal on the deficit. houses of congress are rolling out separate compromises to safe off a default. harry reid is meeting with mitch mcconnell to craft a solution to appeal to both parties. according to reports, this would do the following. it would allow the debt ceiling to be raised three times for a total of $2.5 trillion. in exchange, some $1.5 trillion in spending cuts would be enacted. the plan would be established to identify new deficit cuts. proposal, already, getting a lukewarm response from the fellow republicans. among them, the freshman snar mark arubio and tom coburn. take a listen. >> it gives the president the ability to raise the debt limit. the debt limit isn't the problem. the problem is the debt. the plan, as outlined to me isn't a credible solution. >>
the crucial southern provinces of afghanistan for karzai. his death has been described as a huge setback for karzai and for the international coalition that is trying to support the karzai government in kabul. let's try to understand why he was such a crucial figure. it provides a window into understanding the future of afghanistan. ahmed walid karzai was ruthless with tribes that would not support his brother, cutting them off from any aid and military assistance. in addition, he gave the american and british forces in afghanistan information on hostile tribes, provided crucial intelligence on key groups and militants. he was also the first afghan leader to begin talking with the taliban about cease-fires and their entry into government. in other words, he was a practical deal maker. now, he was famous in the west or notorious for the corruption that surrounded him. but corruption surrounded all of the billions of dollars in american and western military aid and spending being brought into afghanistan. everyone in afghanistan was corrupt. ahmed karzai was an ally and an effective deal m
into understanding the future of afghanistan. amid wally carsi karzai was rut with troops not supporting his brother, cutting them off from any aid. he gave the american and brid tisch forces information on hostile tribes, provided crucial intelligence on key groups and militants. he was the first afghan leader to begin talking with the taliban about ceasefires and their entry in the government. in other words, he was a practical deal maker. now, he was famous in the west or notorious for the corruption that surrounded him. but corruption surrounded all of the billions of dollars in american and western military aid and spending being brought into afghanistan. everyone in afghanistan was corrupt. amid karzai was an ally and effective deal maker. a journalist recalls he was a wheeler dealer in the classic afghan mode. but if tefs a rogue, he was a loveable rogue who charmed you, one way of doing political business in afghanistan. karzai's death reminds us it is the kind of political business he excelled at that we need urgently. that is what will ultimately bring stability to afghanistan, whether the
in southern afghanistan using suicide bombers, rocket propelled grenades and machine guns. the sustained assault targeted the offices of the deputy govern and a private security firm. the trial of desupposed president will start next week in cairo. he faces charges of corruption and ordering the killers of protectors. doctors said he was weak and refusing solid food. the maid who accused the head of the former i.m.f. of trying to rape her claim they have been left traumatized by the accusation. her lawyer says they may launch a civil suit. in china the government is facing a public backlash over the way it handled a high speed train crash that killed 39 people. authorities say the trash was caused by design flaws but allegations of corruption and lack of transparency are fueling public anger. the premiere has visited the crash site. >> this is the soft paternal face of the communist party. in times of a crisis like this one the premiere is called upon to soothe the nation's nerves. he pays his respect but he was also bow to public pressure. >> no matter if it is a mechanical fault, a man
are helping insurgents, enemies of the united states in afghanistan and effectively helping to kill americans and other nato forces there. what are they saying about that? >> well, wolf, it doesn't make sense when you look ate from an american perspective. when i was in pakistan earlier this year, pakistani officials are very concerned about two things. they feel a threat from india. they're worried about the indians having influence in afghanistan. there are some elements within pakistan that use these insurgents in afghanistan as sort of a check on india's power there. they don't like this idea of this rival india having influence on the other side of the border. the other thing they worry about is going into the tribal regions, by doing so they kick up a hornet's nest and then those people start to make attacks in places where people really care. you can liken to a very rural part in alaska, there would be a difference between something happening there and something happening in the heart of times square manhattan. that's sort of the pakistani perspective on that, wolf. >> a juror in the c
in southern afghanistan, killing more than 20 people, including a bbc reporter. the assault targeted the officers of the deputy governor, police headquarters and a private security firm. a u.s. soldier has been arrested near the fort hood military base in texas after being found with bomb-making materials. the serviceman has admitted planning an attack. in china, the government is facing a public backlash over the way it handled a high speed train crash which killed 39. authorities say the crash was called by design flaws and signaling equipment but allegations of corruption and lack of transparency are fueling public anger. the premier has visited the crash site. the bbc's martin patience reports from the scene. >> wen jiabo is the soft paternal face of the communist party. in times like this he's called upon to soothe the nation's nerves. at the crash site he paid his respects but he was also bowing to public pressure. >> no matter if it's a mechanical fault, a management problem, or indeed a manufacturing issue, we will get to the bottom of this. >> the two high-speed trains colli
petteri will be receiving the medal of honor because he had a gun to his head in afghanistan. he was asked to do something for his country, let's ask these people in washington to do something for their country. just get together and get something done. >> you know, there is huge news out of afghanistan this morning that we're going to get to as well as rupert murdoch and his media empire. what's going on with that. >> this is extending, by the way, to "the times" of london? >> yes, the big story. >> the other players, this is earth shattering. i thought the big thing -- i thought it was about one tabloid. whew. this is so serious. >>> ahead this morning, we're going to bring in the ranking member of the budget committee, congressman chris van hollen. and oil tycoon t. boone pickens will be here. eugene robinson. >> by the way, on that story, i mean, they're not tapping the phones of the british prime minister, but they're -- they're trying to get his records -- >> may be an institution that has rot on the the core. it is a big problem. >> medical records. >> bank accounts. >> after the br
in afghanistan's air force. >> and are training in texas. ed lavandara has more on their history making mission. >> reporter: the passion and dreams of these four women easily cuts through their broken english. >> we are going to open the door for our laid niece afghanistan. it is a big deal for us to open the door. ladies that have dreams but can't do it. we want to show them. >> reporter: these laid reese lieutenants in the afghanistan military and have come to the united states to study english at the defense language institute in texas. it is their dreams of piloting helicopters that could help change the future of women in their homeland. >> these young ladies are path finders, trail blazers. and -- as such, they are subject to the criticism and antagonism of those that don't want to see the particular path. >> reporter: the soldiers say they are prepared for the scrutiny and are confident. >> the women of afghanistan, don't be afraid of anything. if you want to do something, you can do it. just believe in yourself you can do it. >> reporter: back home, these women are battling chauvanism.
angeles. afghanistan. and here in frankfurt. where tangelo calhoun led her friends and family in the classic cheer. soccer, long an international favorite, enthralled america in what's been a miserable summer for sports. >> the nfl and the nba have been locked out. baseball going with the roger clemens' mistrial. and this is something americans can see and feel proud of these women going out there and playing for the purity of the sport and winning. >> reporter: but the champions would be japan, a country still reeling from an earthquake, tsunami and nuclear disaster. a victory that came in the middle of the night, and gave a weary nation a reason to celebrate. even in japan, few people thought their team would make it to the finals, let alone bring home the cup by defeating the number-one team in the world. ann? >> ann thompson, thank you very much for your report. i'm glad you got all of that team usa paint off of your face. >> i was working yesterday in the newsroom. no one was working. everyone was cheering. we got it on the air. >>> let's get a check of the rest of the mo
in afghanistan and iraq as to go around the u.s. as a yankees cap. it really is so important is so many ways. a lot of people are happy that the u.s. is taking enthusiasm this time around. i hope the u.s. team wins. i'll be kicking a football around with them a. soccer ball around with them for a while before the match. >> i'm sure you can teach them something. >> me and abby. >> you won't be faking anything. that's for sure. >> no way. >> thanks, kyra. >>> an hour from now, abby is going to talk to us live next hour right here in the cnn "newsroom." >>> in the modern world media, he's the wizard of oz, managing the message behind the curtain. just ahead, we'll take a good hard look at rupert murdoch. >>> and your favorite emmy's are nominating. that's next. there's another way to minimize litter box odor: purina tidy cats. tidy cats premium line of litters now works harder to help neutralize odors in multiple-cat homes. and our improved formula also helps eliminate dust. so it's easier than ever to keep your house smelling just the way you want it. purina tidy cats. keep your home smelling
soldiers fighting in afghanistan and war. people seem to forget that so i would not say that any prime minister would think "the sun" is not fighting for the right people n. fact, qu"the sun" continues to fight for the right people. >> how often will any of those prime ministers ask you as either editor or chief executive, how often would they ever ask you not to publish a story? would they sort of ask you to hide the story? would that happen? >> i can't remember an occasion where a prime minister asked us to not run a story. >> that's not a politicians general that would happen? >> no. i would say that i can remember many occasions when a cabinet minister or politician or a prime minister was very unhappy at the stories we were running. not that they pled directly for it not to run. as long as the story was true and accurate or was part of our campaign, are then there's no reason for a prime minister -- i mean, that's exactly why we have a free press. the. >> this is my final question. there's a feeling that in some way that you had a close relationship with the prime minister. the cu
with afghanistan, and over the years the number has gone up steadily. in the first few years in the strikes of 2,042,007 they're just a handful and then we see it going up in 2010. the obama administration rising at a policy never fully publicly articulated. 118 strikes last year and 45 so far this year. the pakistanis said a couple of months ago that they wanted him stopped them stopped and they ordered the cia out in their base in pakistan were some of the strikes are being launched. by my reckoning there is than a dozen since then. so has this been done like the enlightened raid against the will of the pakistan government? put the whole thing in a different legal contextualization. we don't know that for sure but we know the americans are defensive about in last month for example john brennan tried to relay concerns he took to new targeting procedure and he said that in the past year there hasn't been a single collateral death because of the exceptional proficiency precision of the capabilities we have been able to develop. in other words because they have been checking much more carefully th
currently we have soldiers fighting in afghanistan and people don't seem to forget that. i would not say any prime minister is not fighting for the right people. continues to fight for the right people. >> how would any of those prime ministers ask as editor or chief executive how often or would they ever ask you not to publish a story? would they ask you to spike a story? would that happen? >> i can't remember an occasion of prime minister asked that. >> politicians generally do that? >> no. i can remember many occasions when a cabinet minister or politician or prime minister was very unhappy with stories we were running and -- not that they would ask us not to. >> if they had you would have been interested anyway? >> if the story was true and accurate, no reason for a prime minister -- that is why we have a free press. >> final question. still a feeling that in some way you had a close relationship with the prime minister. the allegation seems to be is no different -- the benefit of what people need to see. you have a close relationship with the prime minister. that was helpful to him and
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)

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